2020 IACLE Awards

Search begins for 2020 IACLE Educator of the Year and Travel Award winners

Six contact lens educators from around the world will be attending major international meetings this year, as winners of the 2020 IACLE Awards. 

The International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE) is offering educators worldwide the chance to become IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year and travel to the annual meeting of the American Academy of Optometry (AAO), Academy 2020 Nashville, in Tennessee, USA (8-10 October). IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year will be awarded to three individuals, one from each of IACLE’s three global regions: 

  • 2020 IACLE Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year
  • 2020 IACLE Asia Pacific Contact Lens Educator of the Year 
  • 2020 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East Contact Lens Educator of the Year

These awards recognize and reward achievements in contact lens education and are sponsored by CooperVision with support from the Academy. The winners will each receive a bursary of up to US$3,000 towards the cost of attending Academy 2020 Nashville and permission to use the title 2020 IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year for their region. 

The IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year Awards are open to all IACLE members who have been paid-up members for at least 3 years. Members can either nominate themselves, or be nominated by another member, their IACLE regional / country coordinator or IACLE staff. Applicants must demonstrate use of IACLE resources, engagement with IACLE, impact on their institution and the ways that they inspire their students to become future contact lens practitioners.  

‘Continuous advances in contact lens technology require ongoing evolution in contact lens education,’ said Dr Gary Orsborn, Vice President of Global Professional and Clinical Affairs for CooperVision. ‘We are proud to continue our partnership with IACLE to recognize the educators who never cease to give their students the best possible preparation for a career in optometry – today, tomorrow, and well into the future. We look forward to celebrating those who rise to the top in 2020.’

The IACLE Travel Awards are bursaries of up to US$3,000 allowing IACLE Educator Members to attend international meetings. The IACLE Travel Awards are sponsored by IACLE through the generous support of all IACLE’s sponsors (Alcon, CooperVision, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Bausch + Lomb and Euclid). 

This year there will be three IACLE Travel Awards. Recipients will attend either Academy 2020 Nashville (one award), or the Association of Optometric Contact Lens Educators (AOCLE) Annual Workshop (one award) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida (28-31 May), or another major meeting to be agreed by the IACLE Executive Board (one award). Academy attendance is supported by AAO and AOCLE attendance by AOCLE.  

‘A dream fulfilled’ is how 2019 IACLE Travel Award recipient Joseph Afonne from Mzuzu University, Malawi described his experience of attending the British Contact Lens Association Clinical Conference in Manchester, UK last year. And 2019 IACLE EAME Contact Lens Educator of the Year Dr Fabrizio Zeri of the Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy said being chosen for this prestigious award was ‘a great honour’.

IACLE President Dr Shehzad Naroo said: ‘I would encourage all members to consider applying for the 2020 awards or perhaps nominate someone for an award. We are grateful to all our sponsors for their support, to CooperVision for continuing to sponsor the Educator Awards, and to the American Academy of Optometry and AOCLE for additional support.’ 

The deadline for entries for the 2020 awards is midnight (EST) on Friday 28 February 2020. Entries must be submitted using the application forms at www.iacle.org (Awards). 

Information on all IACLE membership benefits is available at www.iacle.org.

IACLE calls for entries for 2020 Educator of the Year and Travel Awards

Six contact lens educators from around the world will be attending major international meetings this year, as winners of the 2020 IACLE Awards.

The International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE) is offering educators worldwide the chance to become IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year and travel to the annual meeting of the American Academy of Optometry (AAO), Academy 2020 Nashville, in Tennessee, USA (8-10 October). IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Yearwill be awarded to three individuals, one from each of IACLE’s three global regions: 

  • 2020 IACLE Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year
  • 2020 IACLE Asia Pacific Contact Lens Educator of the Year
  • 2020 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East Contact Lens Educator of the Year

These awards recognize and reward achievements in contact lens education and are sponsored by CooperVision with support from the Academy. The winners will each receive a bursary of up to US$3,000 towards the cost of attending Academy 2020 Nashville and permission to use the title 2020 IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year for their region. 

The IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year Awards are open to all IACLE members who have been paid-up members for at least 3 years. Members can either nominate themselves, or be nominated by another member, their IACLE regional / country coordinator or IACLE staff. Applicants must demonstrate use of IACLE resources, engagement with IACLE, impact on their institution and the ways that they inspire their students to become future contact lens practitioners.  

‘Continuous advances in contact lens technology require ongoing evolution in contact lens education,’ said Dr Gary Orsborn, Vice President of Global Professional and Clinical Affairs for CooperVision. ‘We are proud to continue our partnership with IACLE to recognize the educators who never cease to give their students the best possible preparation for a career in optometry – today, tomorrow, and well into the future. We look forward to celebrating those who rise to the top in 2020.’

The IACLE Travel Awards are bursaries of up to US$3,000 allowing IACLE Educator Members to attend international meetings. The IACLE Travel Awards are sponsored by IACLE through the generous support of all IACLE’s sponsors (Alcon, CooperVision, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Bausch + Lomb and Euclid).

This year there will be three IACLE Travel Awards. Recipients will attend either Academy 2020 Nashville (one award), or the Association of Optometric Contact Lens Educators (AOCLE) Annual Workshop (one award) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida (28-31 May), or another major meeting to be agreed by the IACLE Executive Board (one award). Academy attendance is supported by AAO and AOCLE attendance by AOCLE.  

‘A dream fulfilled’ is how 2019 IACLE Travel Award recipient Joseph Afonne from Mzuzu University, Malawi described his experience of attending the British Contact Lens Association Clinical Conference in Manchester, UK last year. And 2019 IACLE EAME Contact Lens Educator of the Year Dr Fabrizio Zeri of the Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy said being chosen for this prestigious award was ‘a great honour’.

IACLE President Dr Shehzad Naroo said: ‘I would encourage all members to consider applying for the 2020 awards or perhaps nominate someone for an award. We are grateful to all our sponsors for their support, to CooperVision for continuing to sponsor the Educator Awards, and to the American Academy of Optometry and AOCLE for additional support.’

The deadline for entries for the 2020 awards is midnight (EST) on Friday 28 February 2020. Entries must be submitted using the application forms at www.iacle.org (Awards). 

-ENDS-

PICTURE CAPTION: IACLE President Dr Shehzad Naroo (left) and Dr Gary Orsborn (right), Vice President, Global Professional and Clinical Affairs at CooperVision, pictured with some of the 2019 IACLE Awards winners (l-r) Dr Fabrizio Zeri (Italy), Professor Craig Woods (Australia), Joseph Afonne (Malawi) and Dr Rubén Velázquez (Mexico), and BCLA President Professor Sunil Shah (second right), at the 2019 British Contact Lens Association Clinical Conference.

For media enquiries please contact: 

Alison Ewbank 
Communications | International Association of Contact Lens Educators
International Association of Contact Lens Educators
London | United Kingdom
Email: a.ewbank@iacle.org
Work: + 44 208 390 9378 | Mobile: + 44 7732 121 959
Skype: alisonewbank1 | Web: www.iacle.org

NOTES FOR EDITORS 

1. Click here for full details of the IACLE Contact Lens Educator of the Year Awards and here for a full list of previous recipients. 

2. Click here to find out more about the IACLE Travel Awards. 

3. Dr Shehzad Naroo is Reader at Aston University in Birmingham, UK. 

4. Information on all IACLE activities and membership benefits is available at www.iacle.org

5. Details of Academy 2020 Nashville are here and the AOCLE Annual Workshop here.

ABOUT IACLE

The International Association of Contact Lens Educators was established in 1979 and is a non-profit, non-political association. IACLE has more than 869 (as of June 2019) active members in 79 countries and welcomes contact lens educators from all eye care professions and related disciplines. IACLE is dedicated to raising the standard of contact lens education and promoting the safe use of contact lenses worldwide. It is the leading provider of educational and information resources essential to contact lens educators. IACLE is supported by leading global contact lens manufacturers: Platinum Sponsor Alcon, Gold Sponsor CooperVision, Silver Sponsor Johnson & Johnson Vision, Bronze Sponsor Bausch + Lomb and Donor Sponsor Euclid. 

ABOUT COOPERVISION

CooperVision, a unit of CooperCompanies (NYSE:COO), is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of soft contact lenses. The company produces a full array of monthly, two-week and daily disposable contact lenses, all featuring advanced materials and optics. CooperVision has a strong heritage of solving the toughest vision challenges such as astigmatism and presbyopia; and offers the most complete collection of spherical, toric and multifocal products available. Through a combination of innovative products and focused practitioner support, the company brings a refreshing perspective to the marketplace, creating real advantages for customers and wearers. For more information, visit www.coopervision.com.

Educator of The Year Award Recipients

2022

2022 1ACLE Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year2022 IACLE Asia Pacific Contact Lens Educator of the Year2022 IACLE Europe/Africa – Middle East Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Dr Lindsay SicksLavanya KalikivayiCarole Maldonado-Codina

2021

2021 IACLE Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year2021 IACLE Asia Pacific Contact Lens Educator of the Year2021 IACLE Europe/Africa – Middle East Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Dr Johanna GarzónWei XuDr Byki Huntjens

2020

2020 IACLE Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year2020 IACLE Asia Pacific Contact Lens Educator of the Year2020 IACLE Europe/Africa – Middle East Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Professor Renée ReederProfessor Bariah Mohd AliJo Underwood

2019

2019 IACLE Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year 2019 IACLE Asia Pacific Contact Lens Educator of the Year 2019 IACLE Europe/Africa – Middle East Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Dr Rubén Velázquez Professor Craig Woods Dr Fabrizio Zeri

2018

2018 IACLE Americas
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2018 IACLE Asia Pacific
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2018 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Professor Lyndon Jones Assistant Professor Runa Mazumder Wim Borst (left) and Henri Eek (right)

2017

2017 IACLE Americas
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2017 IACLE Asia Pacific
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2017 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Professor Jan Bergmanson Professor Koon-Ja Lee Dr Yazan Gammoh

2016

2016 IACLE Americas
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2016 IACLE Asia Pacific
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2016 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Dr Jorge Giovanni Vargas Dr Prema Chande Professor James Wolffsohn

2015

2015 IACLE Americas
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2015 IACLE Asia Pacific
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2015 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Martín Giraldo Professor Monica Chaudhry Helmer Schweizer

2014

2014 IACLE Americas
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2014 IACLE Asia Pacific
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
2014 IACLE Europe / Africa – Middle East
Contact Lens Educator of the Year
Sergio Garcia
Dr Sergio GarciaDr Rajeswari Mahadevan Dr Eef van der Worp

Research Update Issue 29

 
IACLE - International Association of Contact Lens Educators
May 2019  
 
 
 
 
Welcome to our monthly research update
 
Research Update is a resource available exclusively to IACLE and BCLA members to support your teaching and practice. Each month we send you a summary of some of the interesting findings appearing in peer-reviewed journals that month. Our aim is to help you keep up to date with the latest contact lens and anterior eye research, and to locate articles when you want to know more about a particular topic.
 
More information on Research Update and how to use it in your contact lens teaching here. Access archived issues via Member Login under Research.
 
 
 
Issue 29 – May 2019
 
We begin with the most burning issue of the day: myopia control. A meta-analysis assesses the benefit of outdoor activities on myopia onset and myopic shift among school-aged children. Another study examines the impact of contact lens optical design on accommodative behaviour of children.

Two Turkish studies are reviewed this month. One examines the effect of pregnancy on the lacrimal system through tear osmolarity measurement and the Schirmer test. The other evaluates the effects of different contact lens replacement schedules and materials on the ocular surface and tear function. 

A team from China tries to introduce virtual simulation and 3D printing technology to the teaching of contact lens fitting. We include a study that compares the biocidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide solutions with and without a novel wetting agent. And finally, scientists from Australia explore the link between subjective vision responses and willingness to purchase simultaneous-image contact lenses in presbyopes.

Happy reading!


The IACLE Education Team
 
 
 
Journal reviewed in this issue  
  JOURNAL VOLUME AND ISSUE NUMBER
  Optometry and Vision Science 96:4
  Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics 39:3
  Contact Lens & Anterior Eye 42:2
  Cornea 38:5
  Eye & Contact Lens 45:3
 
 
 
 
 
 MYOPIA
 
Outdoor activities and myopia control
To investigate the protective effect of outdoor activities in myopia control, Deng & Pang conducted a meta-analysis of five prospective intervention clinical studies. Three outcomes were used to assess the benefit of intervention: relative risk, difference in myopic shift rate, and difference in axial elongation rate. The authors found an overall protective effect against myopic shift and axial elongation with outdoor activities. However, the overall treatment sizes for both outcomes (0.13D/year and 0.03mm/year) were small and clinically nonsignificant.

Optom Vis Sci 2019;96:4 276-282. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 MYOPIA
 
Accommodation and myopia control with a soft CL design
Cheng et al evaluated the impact on accommodation and convergence in children wearing investigational soft contact lenses with positive spherical aberration designed for myopia control. Post-hoc analysis was conducted on data from 109 subjects aged 8-11 years from a single-site, 1-year, prospective, randomised, controlled, double-masked clinical trial. The soft lens design resulted in an apparent decrease in accommodation. Reduced accommodative response correlated with greater myopia progression. 

Ophthalmic Physiol Opt 2019;39:3 162-171. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 TEARS
 
Pregnancy and tear osmolarity
To examine the influence of pregnancy on tear osmolarity and symptoms of dry eye, Duran & Güngör performed this prospective case-control study among 60 women (30 pregnant and 30 non-pregnant) with no ocular or systemic disease. Tear osmolarity measurement with the TearLab system and tear function test Schirmer 1 were carried out on one, randomly chosen eye of each participant. Tear osmolarity and Schirmer values decreased significantly towards the end of pregnancy, suggesting a decrease in both test results may have a protective role in the ocular surface during pregnancy.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019; 42:2 196-199. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 OCULAR SURFACE
 
Which lens replacement schedule causes less damage?
To evaluate the effects of different contact lens (CL) replacement schedules and materials on the ocular surface and tear function, Muhafiz et al recruited 71 neophyte subjects to this prospective study. Subjects were divided into three groups and fitted with three different types of CLs: daily disposable hydrogel, daily disposable silicone hydrogel and reusable silicone hydrogel. Tear function tests and inflammatory cytokine levels were evaluated before and after CL use. Wear of daily disposable CLs can be considered to cause less damage to the ocular surface and less increase in proinflammatory cytokines.

Cornea 2019;38:5 587-594. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 
 TECHNOLOGY
 
 
3D printing to simulate RGP lens fitting
To introduce a new approach to simulating the fitting process of rigid gas-permeable (RGP) contact lenses using 3D printing technology, Zhao et al created a hemispherical or parabolic 3D model using 3D Builder or Tinkercad software. A solid model was printed using a 3D printer and used to simulate RGP lens fitting. Models were tested for their ability to simulate common corneal morphologies. 3D printing technology can be applied in the simulation of RGP contact lens fitting, which may become a new teaching method in optometry.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:2 165-169. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 LENS CARE
 
Biocidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide with wetting agent
Gabriel et al compared the antimicrobial effects of a 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution and a solution consisting of the 3% H2O2 solution plus a novel wetting agent, polyoxyethylene-polyoxybutylene (EOBO-21). Three lots of each solution were tested against five compendial microorganisms required by the Food and Drug Administration and International Organization for Standardization, and other clinically relevant microorganisms. The addition of EOBO-21 to enhance lens wettability had no impact on antimicrobial efficacy.

Eye & Contact Lens 2019;45:3 164-170. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 MULTIFOCALS
 
 
Vision and purchase of simultaneous image CLs
Jong et al retrospectively analysed visual acuity (VA) measurements and subjective responses of 141 participants from two randomized, masked, crossover, dispensing trials. The purpose was to investigate the relationship between VAs, subjective vision ratings, and willingness to purchase simultaneous-image contact lenses in presbyopes. Subjective vision ratings were a better indicator of simultaneous-image contact lens performance than VA and hence should be used to evaluate performance rather than VA alone.

Optom Vis Sci 2019;96:4 283-290. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
For more information on Research Update visit www.iacle.org.
 
 

 

© International Association of Contact Lens Educators 2019
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Research Update Issue 28

April 2019  
 
 
 
 
Welcome to our monthly research update
 
Research Update is a resource available exclusively to IACLE and BCLA members to support your teaching and practice. Each month we send you a summary of some of the interesting findings appearing in peer-reviewed journals that month. Our aim is to help you keep up to date with the latest contact lens and anterior eye research, and to locate articles when you want to know more about a particular topic.
 
More information on Research Update and how to use it in your contact lens teaching here. Access archived issues via Member Login under Research.
 
 
 
Special Issue – April 2019
 
International Myopia Institute (IMI) White Papers

Myopia is projected to affect half of the world’s population by 2050 and it is feared that myopia could become the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The Editors of this special edition of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science believe that myopia is a 21st century public health issue.

As a first major step, The International Myopia Institute has published a series of white papers in IOVS on defining and classifying myopia, potential interventions, clinical trials and instrumentation, industry guidelines and ethical considerations, clinical management guidelines, experimental models of emmetropization and myopia, and the genetics of myopia.

These articles, summarizing current knowledge in the field and showing trends for future developments, may form a basis for further research, bridging gaps, and connecting people who so far had not intensively exchanged information and ideas.

Here are some excerpts from the issue.


The IACLE Education Team
 
 
 
Journal reviewed in this issue  
  JOURNAL VOLUME AND ISSUE NUMBER
  Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 60:3 (and download PDFs)
 
 
 
 
 
 DEFINITIONS
 
Defining and classifying myopia
Flitcroft et al conducted a critical review of current terminology and choice of myopia thresholds to provide standardized terminology, definitions and thresholds of myopia, and its main ocular complications. The current consensus threshold for myopia is a spherical equivalent refractive error <0.50D and the corresponding threshold value for high myopia is <6.00D. ‘Pathologic myopia’ is proposed as the term for the adverse, structural complications of myopia, for which the authors also propose a clinical classification.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2019;60:3 M20-M30. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 ANIMAL STUDIES
 
Experimental models of emmetropization and myopia
Troilo et al cover the major findings that studies using animal models have contributed, including: the eye’s ability to detect retinal defocus and undergo compensatory growth, local retinal control of eye growth, regulatory changes in choroidal thickness, and identification of components in the biochemistry of eye growth leading to the characterization of signal cascades regulating eye growth and refractive state. These findings have shifted thinking about the control of eye growth and the development of refractive state.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:3 M31-M88. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 GENETICS
 
Myopia genetics report
To address developments in genetic aspects of myopia, Tedja et al performed an extensive literature search and conducted informal discussions with key stakeholders. Almost 200 genetic loci have been identified for refractive error and myopia. Risk variants mostly carry low risk but are highly prevalent in the general population. Genetic findings offer a world of new molecules involved in myopiagenesis. The authors recommend large-scale, in-depth genetic studies using complementary big data analytics, consideration of gene-environment effects, and a focus on subgroups with extreme phenotypes and high familial occurrence.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:3 M89-M105. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 INTERVENTIONS
 
Controlling myopia onset and progression
Interventions to prevent or delay the onset of myopia and slow its progression are growing in number, but evidence of treatment efficacy is variable. Wildsoet et al reviewed research behind such interventions under four categories: optical, pharmacological, environmental (behavioural) and surgical. In optical, pharmacological, and behavioural interventions, efficacy at an individual level appears variable, none being 100% effective. Understanding this variability and underlying mechanisms may guide combined and novel treatments.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:3 M106-M131. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 
 CLINICAL TRIALS
 
 
Myopia control trials and instrumentation
Wolffsohn et al reviewed outcomes of myopia control trials which they classified as primary (refractive error and/or axial length), secondary (patient reported outcomes and treatment compliance), or exploratory (peripheral refraction, accommodative changes, ocular alignment, pupil size, outdoor activity/lighting levels, anterior and posterior segment imaging, and tissue biomechanics). Recommendations include: minimum 3-year clinical trial; stratified randomisation; mandatory examiner masking and masking of participants wherever possible; and axial length to be used as the primary outcome measure of efficacy of myopia control.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:3 M132-M160. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 GUIDELINES & ETHICS
 
Industry guidelines and ethical considerations
Undertaking myopia control treatments on vulnerable populations creates an ethical challenge for a variety of stakeholders: regulatory bodies, manufacturers, academics, and eye care practitioners (ECPs). Jones et al reviewed published papers and guidance documents to discuss guidelines and ethical considerations for myopia control. ECPs should provide appropriate information to patients who are at risk of developing myopia or for whom myopia-related pathology could occur due to rapidly progressing myopia.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:3 M161-M183. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 MANAGEMENT
 
 
Clinical management guidelines
Gifford et al detail evidence-based best practice for managing the pre-, stable, and progressing myope, including risk factor identification, examination, selecting treatment strategies, and guidelines for ongoing management. ECP considerations such as informed consent, prescribing off-label treatment, and patient/parent communication are explained. ECPs providing myopia management services should have the appropriate training and necessary certification to care for children, and fit contact lenses and/or prescribe ocular medication.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2019;60:3 M184-M203. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
For more information on Research Update visit www.iacle.org.
 
 

IACLE completes New ICLC with dry eye lecture

The final lecture in the New IACLE Contact Lens Course, Dry Eye & Contact Lenses (D4), is now available online exclusively to IACLE members.

The lecture has been fully revised and updated by Professor James Wolffsohn of Aston University, UK and reflects the findings of the TFOS DEWS II Report.

All six modules of the New ICLC, comprising 33 lectures in PowerPoint format, are now completed. The course provides educators with the materials needed to teach a high-quality contact lens course, and is also suitable for students and practitioners. 

Translations into various languages are under way.

Find more information on the New ICLC here and a full list of editors here.

Research Update Issue 27

March 2019  
 
 
 
 
Welcome to our monthly research update
 
Research Update is a resource available exclusively to IACLE and BCLA members to support your teaching and practice. Each month we send you a summary of some of the interesting findings appearing in peer-reviewed journals that month. Our aim is to help you keep up to date with the latest contact lens and anterior eye research, and to locate articles when you want to know more about a particular topic.
 
More information on Research Update and how to use it in your contact lens teaching here. Access archived issues via Member Login under Research.
 
 
 
Issue 27 – March 2019
 

In this issue we bring you various interesting topics related to clinical practice, ocular response and contact lens materials. Dropout has been a perennial concern in contact lens practice. A multi-site study evaluates ocular and lens factors associated with dropout.

Another study looks at the ocular surface of presbyopes wearing modern daily disposable multifocal lenses over a day’s wear. A Turkish group investigates anterior surface inflammation in silicone hydrogel lens wearers with or without meibomian gland dysfunction. And Iranian researchers describe microbial contamination in bandage contact lenses.

We include a couple of studies on material chemistry. An Egyptian group demonstrates release of silver nanoparticles from silicone hydrogel films for sufficient microbial activity. Other researchers examine uptake and release of polyvinyl alcohol from commercially available daily disposable lenses. Finally, we include a study that explores the need for customized multifocal contact lenses.

Happy Reading!


The IACLE Education Team
 
 
 
Journal reviewed in this issue  
  JOURNAL VOLUME AND ISSUE NUMBER
  Contact Lens & Anterior Eye Articles in Press
  Eye & Contact Lens 45:1
  Cornea 38:2
  Optometry and Vision Science 96:3
  Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics 39:1
 
 
 
 
 
 DROPOUT
 
Clinical factors associated with contact lens dropout
To determine ocular and lens factors associated with CL dropout, Pucker et al conducted this prospective, single-visit multi-site study among participants aged 18-45 years who had ceased CL wear within the past 6-12 months due to discomfort. Each subject was administered a symptoms survey and a study-specific survey. Clinical tests included detailed tear assessment. Dropouts were compared to currently successful CL wearers (56 pairs). Dry eye, meibomian gland (MG) plugging, upper eyelid meibum quality, and upper eyelid MG tortuosity significantly increased subjects’ odds of dropping out. Proactively treating MG dysfunction with eyelid hygiene may promote comfort and extra years of comfortable CL use.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2018.12.002. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 PHYSIOLOGY
 
Response of the ageing eye to first day CL wear
In this prospective, non-randomized study, Lafosse et al investigated the ocular surface of an aged population wearing a water-gradient (delefilcon A) daily disposable CL over the first day of wear. Tear osmolarity, tear meniscus area (TMA), and ocular surface aberrations (total higher-order root mean square [RMS]) were assessed at baseline (t0), at 20min (t1) and after 8h (t2) of wear among 40 presbyopic subjects. No statistically significant changes were found between t0, t1, and t2 for TMA, and between t0 and t2 for fluorescein corneal and conjunctival staining. Tear breakup time worsened by the end of the day.

Eye & Contact Lens 2019;45:1 40-45. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 OCULAR RESPONSE
 
Inflammation in silicone hydrogel lens wearers
To determine whether silicone hydrogel contact lens (SH-CL) use, with or without meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), promotes ocular surface inflammation, Yucekul et al recruited 80 patients in four categories (20 each) to this cross-sectional study: SH-CL users with clinical evidence of MGD (group 1), without MGD (group 2), CL-naive patients who had MGD (group 3), and who did not have MGD (group 4). All underwent tear function tests and cytokine evaluation. SH-CL use with concomitant MGD is not associated with cytokine-driven ocular surface inflammation but may affect tear function leading to dry eye symptoms. The presence of MGD should be monitored in CL wear.

Eye & Contact Lens 2019;45:1 61-66. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 BANDAGE LENSES
 
Microbiological evaluation of bandage contact lenses
This prospective study by Feizi et al aimed to describe microbiological contamination of bandage soft contact lenses used for management of persistent corneal epithelial defects and enrolled 57 consecutive eyes. Most bandage lenses (70.2%) used for this purpose did not show bacterial growth when placed in an enriched medium. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most common microorganism isolated from the contaminated lenses. Infectious keratitis was not observed in any eyes.

Cornea 2019;38:2 146-150. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 
 MATERIALS
 
 
Silver nanoparticles and silicone hydrogel films
Mourad et al investigated the effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) incorporated in silicone-hydrogel films on their physico-chemical properties and microbial activity. Silicone-hydrogel composite films (SiHCFs) were prepared by in-situ chemical reduction of silver ions added in different concentrations followed by ultraviolet (UV) casting. Physico-mechanical properties of the SiHCFs were evaluated and antimicrobial activity and biofilm formation of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus assessed. Incorporation of AgNPs into SiHCFs showed sufficient release of AgNPs to inhibit bacterial growth and reduce biofilm formation, with collateral enhancement of some mechanical properties.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2019.02.007. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 MATERIALS
 
Uptake and release of PVA from contact lenses
The purpose of this study by Phan et al was to evaluate the uptake and release of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) from three commercially available hydrogel contact lens materials (etafilcon A, omafilcon A, and nelfilcon A) replaced on a daily disposable basis. After 24h incubation in a 10-mg/mL solution of PVA, the lenses were evaluated using refractive index and an iodine-borate assay. The results suggest that the contact lenses tested in this study have similar efficiency in delivering PVA. These materials could be used to release the wetting agent for a short duration and potentially improve initial comfort.

Optom Vis Sci 2019;96:3 180-186. Click here for abstract
 
 
 
 
 
 MULTIFOCALS
 
 
Could customization improve image quality?
Faria-Ribeiro & Gonzàlez-Mèijome looked at whether eyes with spherical aberration (SA) outside average levels underperform when fitted with a simultaneous-imaging contact lens (CL) with a power profile calculated for an ‘average eye’, and whether CL customization could improve image quality in these eyes. They used a statistical model of the wavefront aberration function of normal eyes to generate a vector of Zernike fourth-order SA coefficients from 100 synthetic eyes. Findings confirmed the hypothesis and suggest that visual performance with multifocals can be improved by using a semi-customized approach.

Ophthalmic Physiol Opt 2019;39:1 37-45. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
For more information on Research Update visit www.iacle.org.
 
 

Research Update Issue 26

February 2019  
 
 
 
 
Welcome to our monthly research update
 
Research Update is a resource available exclusively to IACLE and BCLA members to support your teaching and practice. Each month we send you a summary of some of the interesting findings appearing in peer-reviewed journals that month. Our aim is to help you keep up to date with the latest contact lens and anterior eye research, and to locate articles when you want to know more about a particular topic.
 
More information on Research Update and how to use it in your contact lens teaching here. Access archived issues via Member Login under Research.
 
 
 
Special Issue – February 2019
 

Scleral Lens Special Edition

By now nobody doubts that scleral lenses work; since the resurgence of modern scleral lens fitting,many patients who did not have a satisfactory visual correction are visually rehabilitated because of access to this modality.

In past decade, scleral lenses have become very popular as well as one of the main lens modalities for irregular and challenging corneas.‘At the same time, this modality is still in its infancy, and we are still investigating and experiencing some growing pains,’ say the Guest Editors for this special edition of Contact Lens & Anterior Eye. This edition presents a number of these ‘growing pains’, including issues such as potential limited tear filmexchange and oxygen delivery to the cornea, and changes to the ocular surface as a result of scleral lenswear.

Here are some excerpts from the issue.


The IACLE Education Team
 
 
 
Journal reviewed in this issue  
  JOURNAL VOLUME AND ISSUE NUMBER
  Contact Lens & Anterior Eye 42:1
 
 
 
 
 
 PATIENT OUTCOMES
 
Visual and physiological outcomes of scleral lens wear
To describe patient-specific outcomes of scleral lens wear utilizing a variety of lens designs, Schornacket al administered a web-based survey to eye care providers who prescribe scleral lenses.A total of 292 valid responses were received from 26 countries. The most commonly reported indication for scleral lens wear was corneal irregularity (87%) followed by ocular surface disease (8%). Patients with corneal irregularity experienced the greatest improvement in visual acuity. Ocular surface condition improved in patients with both corneal irregularity and ocular surface disease.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 3-8. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 FIT ASSESSMENT
 
Strategies for fitting and assessing scleral lenses
The SCOPE (Scleral Lenses in Current Ophthalmic PracticeEvaluation) study group designed and administered a 22-item electronic survey regarding scleral lens fitting and assessment strategies to attendees of the 2017 Global Specialty Lens Symposium. Of 95 practitioners responding, new prescribers considered base curve first (60%) while experienced prescribers considered sagittal depth first (63%) in their initial scleral lens selection. Among practitioners with greater than 5 years of scleral lens experience, a consensus has emerged for best practices.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 9-14. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 TOPOGRAPHY
 
Placido corneal topography data and fitting parameters
Macedo-de-Araújo et al analyzed the relationship between corneal sagittal height and asymmetry parameters derived from Placido-video-keratoscopy with the parameters of fitted scleral lenses (ScCLs). Corneal topographies were measured in 126 eyes with irregular and regular corneas. Estimated Height (EHChord) parameters were taken for a chord equal to the diameter of the lens that each subject was wearing at different semi-meridians. These outcomes were correlated to ScCL parameters that subjects were wearing after 1 month. EHChord attributes were the parameters that best correlated with the ScCL sagittal height.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 20-27. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 TEARS
 
Tear dynamics under scleral lenses
This prospective, double-masked, randomized, bilateral, crossover study was conducted by Tse et al to evaluate post-lens tear dynamics at two different time points during scleral lens wear. All subjects wore scleral lenses for 5h on three separate visits. Out-in measurements were collected at 5h post-lens insertion in Group 1 (10 subjects) and compared with those obtained at 20min of lens wear in Group 2 (10 subjects). Tear flow into the tear reservoir under a scleral lens on these healthy corneas occurred at 20min and 5h after lens insertion.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 43-48. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 
 OXYGEN
 
 
Corneal oedema with sealed minisclerals
Vincent et al examined the magnitude and time course of central epithelial, stromal and total corneal thickness changes during sealed miniscleral lens wear. High-resolution OCT images were captured over an 8h period of miniscleral wear in 15 young, healthy participants with normal corneas. Scleral lens-induced oedema was stromal in nature. A significant increase in total corneal thickness was observed 15min following lens insertion which stabilised 45min after insertion and peaked after 90min of wear, while central epithelial thickness gradually decreased throughout lens wear. A greater initial central corneal clearance resulted in reduced oxygen delivery to the cornea, which had minimal short-term impact in healthy eyes. 

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 49-54. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 FLEXURE
 
Centre thickness and miniscleral lens flexure
To investigate the influence of centre thickness on miniscleral lens flexure and the association between lens flexure and scleral toricity, Vincent et al recruited nine healthy young participants with normal corneas and fitted them with 16.5mm minisclerals with centre thicknesses of 150, 250, and 350μm. Lens flexure was measured using a videokeratoscope. Decreasing the centre thickness from 350μm to150μm resulted in <0.25D increase in lens flexure for a high Dk and low modulus material. Scleral toricity >200μm was associated with more in-vivo lens flexure, with implications for lens designs for these eyes.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 63-69. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
 
 CONTRAINDICATIONS
 
 
Scleral lenses: to fit or not to fit?
Fadel & Kramer’s review aims to illustrate the conditions for which scleral lenses (SL) are potentially contraindicated or require caution, namely: low endothelial cell density; Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy; glaucoma (because of the risk of increased intraocular pressure, and the existence and location of draining devices and blebs); or overnight wear. When benefits outweigh risks, careful documentation and achievable baseline measurements, photography, and other ocular examinations are helpful, and frequent follow-ups should be scheduled. Improved knowledge of SL limits should reduce the risk of adverse events and increase the likelihood of fitting success.

Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2019;42:1 92-103. Click here for full text
 
 
 
 
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