Research Update

Research Update Issue 13

January 2018

We begin the new year with diverse topics in the field of contact lenses, in this our first issue of 2018.

Contact lenses in youth have been drawing the industry’s attention. In this issue, we include a study that differentiates behaviors of young patients presenting with serious and non-serious adverse events 

January 2018  
 
 
 
 

Welcome to our monthly research update
 
Research Update is a resource available exclusively to IACLE and BCLA members to support your teaching and practice. Each month we send you a summary of some of the interesting findings appearing in peer-reviewed journals that month. Our aim is to help you keep up to date with the latest contact lens and anterior eye research, and to locate articles when you want to know more about a particular topic.
 
More information on Research Update and how to use it in your contact lens teaching here. Access archived issues via Member Login under Research.
 
 
 
Issue 13 – January 2018
 
We begin the new year with diverse topics in the field of contact lenses, in this our first issue of 2018.

Contact lenses in youth have been drawing the industry’s attention. In this issue, we include a study that differentiates behaviors of young patients presenting with serious and non-serious adverse events. Bringing the focus onto multifocal contact lenses, we review a paper that explores the relationship between discontinuation and lens design. Another study investigates the effect of multifocal lens design on contrast sensitivity and disability glare.

A group from the UK identifies the characteristics of keratoconic patients lost to follow-up. We also report on a study that validates the accuracy of observers’ ability to estimate central corneal clearance in scleral lens fitting. Finally, we include a paper that investigates whether lysozyme deposition on soft lenses could act as a barrier against subsequent albumin adsorption.

Happy reading!

The IACLE Education Team
 
 
 
Journals reviewed in this issue  

  JOURNAL VOLUME AND ISSUE NUMBER
 
  Eye & Contact Lens 44:1
  Contact Lens & Anterior Eye Articles in press
  Clinical and Experimental Optometry 100:6
  Optometry and Vision Science 95:1, 94:11
 
 
 
 
 
 ADVERSE EVENTS
 

Risky behaviours among young SCL wearers
Sorbara et al tested the ability of the Contact Lens Assessment in Youth Contact Lens Risk Survey to differentiate behaviors among those with serious and significant (S&S, n=96) CL-related corneal inflammatory events, from those with other events (non-S&S, n=68) and controls (n=207). Patients with S&S were more likely to report overnight wear or purchase SCLs on the internet, versus patients with non-S&S and versus controls. Patients with S&S were less likely to regularly discard leftover solution compared with controls. The study also reaffirmed the use of DD lenses as a means to reduce S&S risk.

Eye & Contact Lens 2018;44:1 21-28. Click here for abstract

 
 
 
 
 
 MULTIFOCALS
 

Fitting success for different multifocal designs
To determine whether discontinuation from simultaneous-vision multifocal soft contact lenses (MFCL) is independent of the multifocal design, Novillo-Díaz et al conducted a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial among 150 single-vision SCL wearers. At one month, a spherical near centered lens (S-CN) had a significantly higher risk of discontinuation than a distance centered lens (CD) and aspherical near centered lens (A-CN). Discontinuation from MFCLs is dependent on the design. The most common cause of dropout was poor distance vision and psychosocial factors did not have an impact.

Contact Lens and Anterior Eye 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.clae.2017.12.012. Click here for full text

 
 
 
 
 
 MULTIFOCALS
 

Disability glare with soft multifocal lenses
To investigate the effect of multifocal contact lenses (MFCL) designs on contrast sensitivity (CS) and disability glare, Wahl et al recruited 16 young adults and measured contrast sensitivity under two conditions: no-glare and glare. Two MFCL designs – center near (CN) and center distance (CD) – were used to simulate correction for presbyopia. The CN design resulted in the lowest contrast sensitivities, compared to the CD design, trial frame correction and single vision CL. MFCL design has a significant impact on CS and on disability glare.

Contact Lens & Anterior Eye 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.clae.2017.10.002. Click here for full text

 
 
 
 
 
 KERATOCONUS
 

Why do keratoconic contact lens wearers drop out?
In this retrospective analysis of 102 keratoconic CL wearers lost to follow-up, Russell et al identified characteristics of patients who discontinued or continued attendance. They then investigated how discontinued cases were managing, along with the reasons for discontinuation. Lens BOZR was not associated with non-attendance. In general, neophytes and those wearing a lens in one eye were more likely to discontinue. Poor comfort, handling problems and the ability to manage without lenses were the most common reasons cited for discontinuation.

Clin Exp Optom 2017;100:6 616-622. Click here for abstract

 
 
 
 
 
 SCLERAL LENSES
 

Assessing scleral lens clearance
Yeung & Sorbara compared the accuracy of observers’ ability to estimate scleral CL central corneal clearance (CCC) with biomicroscopy to measurements using slit-lamp imaging and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Sixty-six novice, intermediate and advanced fitters estimated CCC by viewing images of four scleral lens fits obtained with a slit-lamp video imaging system. Responses were compared with known values of CCC. Results validated the ability of practitioners to estimate CCC using biomicroscopy.

Optom Vis Sci 2018;95:1 13-20. Click here for abstract

 
 
 
 
 
 MATERIALS
 

Albumin deposition on contact lenses
Babaie Omali et al investigated whether lysozyme deposition on soft CLs in vitro could act as a barrier against albumin adsorption. Albumin adsorption may increase the risk of bacterial binding and reduce comfort. Six hydrogel lens types were lysozyme coated and uncoated lenses were used as control. Lysozyme-coated etafilcon A lenses exhibited lower levels of deposited albumin than uncoated etafilcon A lenses. There were no differences in albumin adsorption between coated and uncoated lenses for the other lens types tested.

Optom Vis Sci 2018;94:11 1047-1051. Click here for abstract

 
 
 
 
 
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